Read On.

Still, the speechlessness outweighs everything. And still silence seems to be one way to pay respects to all the victims.

Elsa Cayat was the only woman present when the assault took place. Elsa Cayat, a fabulous woman, a great psychoanalyst, thinker and writer is portrayed in Le Figaro. ( In French )

What we talk about, when we talk about terrorism is enlightened in an interview with Jacques Derrida after 9/ 11 but still most insightful when grasping for words.

For the first time after World War II the Grand Synagogue of Paris closed its doors for its Shabbat Service. I ask myself, if we as Jews living in Europe, just ignored that our situation becomes more and more fragile? Do we still dream the same dream as those living with us? Is it normal to all of you and all of us that Jews are murdered just while doing some grocery shopping? #JeSuisJuif

The cartoonist Soufeina Hamed draws cartoons, which can make us think more deeply.

In the meantime the blogger and political activist Raif Badawi is flogged in public. We are outrageous.

Read On

A shocking, insightful and very depressing text written by the great blogger and insightful feminist Caroline Criado-Perez on the threats and hate she experienced on Twitter.

Heart-warming and a great appeal for the strength and liveliness of Yiddish, Isaac Bashevi’s Singers Noble Prize speech in Stockholm 1978 and a shorter version in English. Repeat. Repeat. Repeat.

Turn your Swag on. Contemporary Hip Hop musicians drawing on 16th century fashion.

The Iran is so much more we believe it to be and so it is time to meet more of those who move the country in a very different direction. The Persian version of skateboarding is a wonderful and moving example.

One of my favorite Irish food-blogger’s Conor Bofin shares a great pie-recipe and ditches spammers in a wonderful way.

Agitationism is this year’s main theme on Ireland’s Biennial. Rebecca O’ Dwyer reflects why the EVA in Limerick is worth a visit or two or three…

My sister recommends La Roux new tune for rainy May days, as we have here in an endless, cold row.

Read On

I was twelve years old when a copy of 100 Years of Solitude fell into my hands. It was a copy borrowed by Ms. Burton, my piano teacher, an old English spinster with a back straight as a marble wall, who never smiled but sometimes discreetly coughed into her handkerchief, one of the last members of the colonial administration in Kenya where I grew up and borrowed this book without asking her, fascinated by its cover and than by its story, when I brought it back, discreetly hidden into piles of notes, she did not seem to notice but in the very next lesson she let me play a piece of Luis Antonio Escobar, trying to hide her smile in her enormous handkerchief. Gabriel García Marquéz would have liked her a lot.We will miss the great magician of literature badly. Here, Márquez meets Hemingway.

The art of translation as a piece of art itself, marvelously shown by Barbara Wright.

I was never a great reader of Thomas Wolfe, but I will never forget his intense and extremely detailed description of a food pantry in ” Look Homeward, Angel”. Fictitious dishes transforms literature into plates.

Una Mullaly is angry. Ireland is in need of much more constructive anger.

My sister is in an apparently good mood. This is has something to do with this good mood creating song. ( And no it is not another version of HAPPY.)

 

Read On

Mridula Chari explains what a nail clipper and cauliflower have to do with the upcoming elections in India.

The publishing house Persephone Books stands itself for a symbol of beautifully designed books with a special focus on woman writers of the early twentieth century.

What about Zambia? What do we know about Zambia? Kalaki’s Korner tell us what we otherwise would miss. And we would miss much.

The Swiss Writer Urs Widmer died. His latest book published in English was My Mother’s Lover a wonderful and heartbreaking tale about two lovers too far away to reach each other.

Look at this, all painted on glass by David A. Smith says my sister, “Who?” ask I, oh shame on you, says J. and is of course right.

 

Read On

Listen to the voice. Hearing Michel Foucault talking about the meaning of  “parrhesia”.

A true brother of Bulgakow’s Margarita is to be found in ” The Maya Pill” by German Sadulaev, who depicts Post-Soviet Russia with dark humor, even if humor is no all-cure.

Darryl Pinckney travels with us in a far forgotten land and finds the heart of Harlem.

Tamer Söyler  depicts a pattern of corruption practices in Turkey via kafila.

What a life ! What a woman! Happy Birthday, dear great Gloria Steinem !

My sister wants to know if Chris Martin and Gwyneth Paltrow have a final song of their own. If not, they can try this song.

 

Read On

“Are you like this?” Lance Richardson writes about the difficulties ( not exclusively ) for gay people when traveling  around in homophobic countries.

Do you know her? When your answer is no, AUTOSTRADDLE will introduce you to most extraordinary and marvelous LGBT women.

While I move between Logistics and Academia, Alain Delorme shows how to move more than things.

Adam Mestyan writes about a place with history for historians.

Today is Pancake day in Ireland. Yes, the Irish know how to celebrate, so relax, prepare yourself a fluffy dough and listen to the great John Mc Elroy on Bookworm.

Finally a Limerick ! And what a wonderful one!

My sister loves Neneh Cherry . Why do have older sister’s always to be that right?

Read On

Linguist Gretchen Mc Culloch explains why the the Meme Doge relates to much more or many more than pictures of dogs.

When the curtain falls,it is worth looking behind the Bechdel Test.

A life spanning from Oran to Donegal, combining intellectual life and fresh-baked bread, now Paul Chatenoud died at the age of 73.

Sybille Bergemann shows pictures of timeless intensity via Filippo Venturi.

You still search for a way to make a living? via Herzdamengeschichten.

Why don’t give it a try while the Dublin Film Festival continues?

My sister listens to Ibrahim Ferrer all day long.